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Promoting British Values

Democracy:

Democracy is evident within the school. Pupils have the opportunity to have their voices heard through our Pupil Council and Pupil questionnaires. The elections of Head Girl and Head boy and House Captains, as well as the weekly Golden certificate and the end of term Ethos Award. Our school behaviour policy involves rewards which the pupils vote on as a class group.

The Rule of Law:

The importance of Laws, whether they be those that govern the class, the school, or the country, are consistently reinforced throughout regular school days, as well as when dealing with behaviour and through school assemblies. Pupils are taught the value and reasons behind laws, that they govern and protect us, the responsibilities that this involves and the consequences when laws are broken. Visits from authorities such as the Police; Fire Service; Lifeguards etc. are regular parts of our calendar and help reinforce this message.

Individual Liberty:

Christ the King is a Rights Respecting School. In our Christ the King we believe “rights” are things every child should have or be able to do. All children have the same rights and these rights are listed in the UN convention on the right of the child. We have considered these rights in terms of what is best, and age appropriate for the children in our school and in terms of what is critical to life and protection from harm. Within Christ the King, pupils are actively encouraged to make choices, knowing that they are in a safe and supportive environment. As a school we educate and provide boundaries for young pupils to make choices safety, through the provision of a safe environment and empowering education. Pupils are encouraged to know, understand and exercise their rights and personal freedoms and advise how to exercise these safely, for example through our E-Safety and PSHE lessons. Whether it is through choice of challenge, of how they record, of participation in our numerous extra-curricular clubs and opportunities, pupils are given the freedom to make choices.

Mutual Respect:

Part of our school ethos and behaviour policy has revolved around the Gospel Core Values such as Love, Faith, Hope, Truth, Joy, Prayer and Mission. Pupils have been part of discussions and assemblies related to what this means and how it is shown. Posters around the school promote respect for others and this is reiterated through our classroom and learning rules, as well as our behaviour policy.

Tolerance of those of Different Faiths and Beliefs:

This is achieved through enhancing pupils understanding of their place in a culturally diverse society and by giving them opportunities to experience such diversity. Assemblies and discussions involving prejudices and prejudice-based bullying have been followed and supported by learning in RE and PSHE. Members of different faiths or religions are encouraged to share their knowledge to enhance learning within classes and the school. We have built into our curriculum One World Week every January when each class adopts a country and a culture to study. Our School Council is very successful in promoting tolerance of other faiths in particular with their charity work. The whole school supports CAFOD, Save the Children, and Mary Thompson Fund for refugees, Mission Together, Zoe’s Place and when there is a specific need with any global catastrophe.

Christ the Kings British Values Statement:

Democracy:

Christ the King upholds and explores this value.

  • The school processes are democratic, for staff and pupils alike.
  • Pupils' voices are heard and have an appropriate influence on the life of the school.
  • Teachers are consulted and included in the decision-making process.
  • Teachers are aware of their own undemocratic tendecies in favouring or punishing certain types of children. Senior school leaders share recent research on fairness in the classroom, e.g. in outcomes by race or gender.
  • Pupils have capacity to explore democracy itself. Young pupils can reflect on what makes something fair. Older pupils can learn about democracy and debate it as a value and as a political system.

The Rule of Law:

Christ the King upholds and explores this value.

  • In school terms, the school rules apply to all pupils, and all pupils are equally subject to the rules.
  • Younger pupils have the chance to reflect on why rules exist and how fairness is attempted through systems of rules, both in a classroom setting and across the whole school.
  • Young pupils encounter representatives of the Fire Service, Police, health professionals and others to learn about the reasoning and purpose behind particular sets of rules, such as road safety.
  • Older pupils learn about the history of the rule of law in Britian and the significance of Magna Carta and other milestones in the UK history.
  • Older pupils consider whether all British citizens are really equal before the law in units of planned work on prejudice and discrimination.

Indivudual Liberty:

Christ the King upholds and explores this value.

  • Across all phases of schooling, pupils are given opportunities to make choices and respect the choices of others.
  • This prepares younger pupils to be aware of the importance of taking responsibility for their choices.
  • Older pupils are given the opportunity to explore and consider the balance between rights, responsibilities, diversity and belonging that make up daily life in a diverse country like Britian. 
  • Older pupils learn about the historical circumstances that led to the value of individual liberty and the liberal state.

Mutual Respect:

Christ the King upholds and explores this value.

  • All staff model respectful behaviour, towards each other, parents and pupils.
  • All staff model respectful behaviour of the school environment. All staff and pupils are expected to take litter seriously; displays celebrate student achievement, and the environment is warm and welcoming, a source of pride for members of the school community.
  • Expectations for all pupils are extremely high when it comes to respect; they behave respectfully towards each other, all adults and the school environment at all times.
  • Rewards and sanctions are developed partly with a view to creating and sustaining a respectful environment. 
  • Certain curriculum areas call for respectful attitudes in order to learn effectively, especially RE, PE, the Arts and Humanities subjects. These subjects are supported and celebrated around the school.

 

Tolerance of those of Different Faiths and Beliefs:

Christ the King upholds and explores this value.

  • Younger pupils will learn about the notion od tolerance first in terms of interpersonal behaviour in the classroom, which is part of learning to live with each other. Asking questions such as: 'Is it fair? What shall we do when things are not fair?'
  • Younger pupils reflect on how they function harmoniously as a group, thinking about co-operation, sharing and being kind and generous to one another.
  • Older pupils learn about the history in Europe of the value of tolerance through studying the wars of religion, religious intoerance and positive examples.
  • Older pupils consider the value of tolerance as given by the state to groups within the state, and as a factor of interpersonal relationships, relating this to questions about human rights and freedoms. 
  • Older pupils debate the value and limits of tolerance and consider its relationship to acceptance, mutual understanding, warmth and love.
  • Curriculum areas which offer the opportunity to learn about and explore the value of tolerance, especially RE, History, PE and PHSE, are supported and celebrated around the school.
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